Codes & Standards

Building codes and standards affect much of the ready mixed concrete construction in the United States. The purpose of any building code is to provide a safe building for all occupants, owners and emergency responders. Building codes are intended to provide a prescriptive requirement for building construction and are enforced at the local or state governmental level. Individual state and local governments are free to adopt their own codes; however, most adopt model building codes that are developed and maintained by the International Code Council (ICC). The ICC publishes the International Building Code (IBC, International Residential Code (IRC), International Energy Conservation Code, among others.

Through participation on codes committees and work with associated organizations, NRMCA’s Codes and Standards programs helps to develop codes that are most responsive to the issues affecting our industry. The Association’s programs also are aimed at increasing the ready mixed concrete industry’s awareness of the codes and standards development process.

Building Types

Buildings and structures to be erected, altered or extended in height or area are classified in one of the five construction types defined below. The building elements have a fire-resistance rating not less than that specified in Table 601 and exterior walls shall have a fire-resistance rating not less than that specified in Table 602 of the International Building Code.

Building Types per IBC Section 601

TYPE I-A–Fire Resistive Non-combustible (Commonly found in high-rise buildings).
3 Hr. Structural Frame 2 Hr. Floor/Ceiling Assembly 1 1⁄2 Hr. Roof Protection
TYPE I-B–Fire Resistive Non-Combustible (Commonly found in mid-rise office).
2 Hr. Structural Frame 2 Hr. Ceiling/Floor Separation 1 Hr. Ceiling/Roof Assembly

TYPE II-A–Protected Non-Combustible (Commonly found in school buildings).
1 Hr. Structural Frame 1 Hr. Floor/Ceiling/Roof Protection
TYPE II-B–Unprotected Non-Combustible (Most common type of non-combustible construction used in commercial buildings).
Building constructed of non-combustible materials but these materials have no fire resistance.

TYPE III-A–Protected Combustible (Also known as “ordinary” construction with brick or block walls and a wooden roof or floor assembly which is 1 hour fire protected).
2 Hr. Exterior Walls* 1 Hr. Structural Frame 1 Hr. Floor/Ceiling/Roof Protection
TYPE III-B–Unprotected Combustible (Also known as “ordinary” construction; has brick or block walls with a wooden roof or floor assembly which is not protected against fire. These buildings are frequently found in “warehouse” districts of older cities.)
2 Hr. Exterior Walls* No fire resistance for structural frame, floors, ceilings, or roofs.

TYPE IV–Heavy Timber (also known as “mill” construction; to qualify all wooden members must have a minimum nominal dimension of 8 inches.) CLT has already been approved as Type IV in last code cycle.
2 Hr. Exterior Walls* 1 Hr. Structural Frame or Heavy Timber
Heavy Timber Floor/Ceiling/Roof Assemblies

TYPE V-A–Protected Wood Frame (Commonly used in the construction of newer apartment buildings; there is no exposed wood visible.)
1 Hr. Exterior Walls 1 Hr. Structural Frame 1 Hr. Floor/Ceiling/Roof
TYPE V-B–Unprotected Wood Frame (Examples of Type V-N construction are single family homes and garages. They often have exposed wood so there is no fire resistance.)

For information regarding this program and code activities, contact Tien Peng.

State and Local Government Affairs

NRMCA encourages the adoption of statewide legislation that benefits the built environment to make it more durable, resilient, and sustainable. NRMCA can assist in the adoption of statewide or local legislation by providing example model language.

Sustainability

For information regarding this program and code activities, contact Tien Peng.

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