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 Online Human Resource Search Vehicles    Federal Employment Regulations  

 


 

 

Federal Employment Regulations

 

The list and links to key federal laws and regulations are intended to be a resource for the industry. The brief descriptions were authored by the federal government and their web links are included. The list is organized by company size. The list, as well as their links to the federal government sites, is not intended to be inclusive, but to give a company a starting point for compliance research. Also of importance is noting that each of the 50 states and US territories have further regulations tied to federal law, or other laws and regulations of their own, that can also require compliance.

 

Therefore, it is strongly recommended that in your planning process your Human Resources professional work with legal counsel who is an employment law specialist. NRMCA assumes no liability that the list is complete, accurate, or requires your company’s compliance. It is solely intended for information purposes. Finally, the OES/HR Task Group recommends the services of SHRM (Society for Human Resource Management). It is a great resource for further information.

 

 

No. of Employees
for Compliance
Federal Statute or Regulation Federal Government Summary HR Function

1

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Expands Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) for laid off employees and Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) for employer. Click here Compensation/Benefits

1

American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 Impacts payroll deduction in that the Act increases tax rates for married couples whose annual income is $450,000+ and individuals whose income is $400,000. Compensation/Benefits

1

Consumer Credit Protection Act of 1968 This federal wage garnishment law protects employees from discharge by their employers because their wages have been garnished for any one debt, and limits the amount of an employee's earnings that may be garnished in any one week. Click here Compensation/Benefits

1

Dodd-Frank Act of 2011 One provision relates to publically traded companies executive compensation and parachute packages. Click here Business Strategy
Compensation/Benefits

1

Electronic Commmunication Privacy Act of 1986 The ECPA, as amended, protects wire, oral, and electronic communications while those communications are being made, are in transit, and when they are stored on computers. The Act applies to email, telephone conversations, and data stored electronically. Click here

As with other forms of communication protected under ECPA, an employer is generally forbidden from accessing an employee’s private e-mails. However, if consent is given in the form of an employment contract that explicitly authorizes the employer to access e-mails, it may be lawful under ECPA for him to do so. Click here

Employment Processes

1

Employee Polygraph Protection Act of 1988 Employers generally may not require or request any employee or job applicant to take a lie detector test, or discharge, discipline, or discriminate against an employee or job applicant for refusing to take a test. Employers are required to publically display the EPPA poster in the workplace. Click here.

This law bars most employers from using lie detectors on employees, but permits polygraph tests only in limited circumstances. Click here

Employment Processes
Risk Management
/Safety

1

Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) of 1974 Applies if a company offers the benefits. The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) is a federal law that sets minimum standards for most voluntarily established pension and health plans. Click here Compensation/Benefits

1

Equal Pay Act (EPA) of 1963 It is illegal to pay different wages to men and women if they perform equal work in the same workplace. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. Click here Compensation/Benefits
Diversity

1

Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 Amends the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) of 1969 to include a business's responsibility in disposal of the employee's or prospective employees credit information. Click here Compensation/Benefits
Employment Processes

1

Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) of 1969 Act specifically denotes the boundaries for employers using consumer credit reports in hiring, promoting, or retention of prospective and current employees. Click here Compensation/Benefits
Employment Processes

1

Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) of 1938 Prescribes standards for the basic minimum wage and overtime pay and affects most private and public employment. It requires employers to pay covered employees who are not otherwise exempt at least the federal minimum wage and overtime pay of one-and-one-half-times the regular rate of pay. For nonagricultural operations, it restricts the hours that children under age 16 can work and forbids the employment of children under age 18 in certain jobs deemed too dangerous. Click here Compensation/Benefits Employment
Processes
Labor
Risk Management
/Safety

1

Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) of 1935 This is a federal tax. Employees and employers contribute through a deduction from an employee's paycheck. It covers Social Security and Medicare benefits for retired, disabled, and children of deceased workers. Click here Compensation/Benefits

1

Federal Mine Safety and Health Act (Mine Act) of 1977 Applies to aggregate quarries: The U.S. Department of Labor's (DOL) Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) inspect all mines each year to ensure safe and healthy work environments for miners. In addition to setting safety and health standards for preventing hazardous and unhealthy conditions, MSHA's regulations establish requirements for:
-Immediate notification by the mine operator of accidents, injuries, and illnesses at the mine;
-Training programs that meet the requirements of the Mine Act; and
Obtaining approval for certain equipment used in gassy underground mines.
-The Mine Act covers all mine operators and miners throughout the United States, including the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands Click here
Employee Development
Risk Management
/Safety

1

Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) of 2008 Prohibits discrimination in group health plan coverage based on genetic information; employer cannot request genetic information, discriminate in hiring, firing, promoting, or benefits allowance. Click here

Genetic information may be acquired through a genetic monitoring program that monitors the biological effects of toxic substances in the workplace where the monitoring is required by law or, under carefully defined conditions, where the program is voluntary. Click here

Compensation/Benefits
Employment Processes
Labor
Risk Management
/Safety

1

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 Applies if a company offers health care benefits. Limits the ability of a new employer plan to exclude coverage for preexisting conditions;
Provides additional opportunities to enroll in a group health plan if an employee loses other coverage or experience certain life events;
Prohibits discrimination against employees and their dependent family members based on any health factors they may have, including prior medical conditions, previous claims experience, and genetic information; and
Guarantees that certain individuals will have access to, and can renew, individual health insurance policies. Click here
Compensation/Benefits

1

Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2007 Amends Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 to clarify that a discriminatory compensation decision or other practice that is unlawful under such Acts and occurs each time compensation is paid pursuant to the discriminatory compensation decision or other practice, and for other purposes. Click here Compensation/Benefits
Employment Processes
Labor

1

National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act) Lays out rights of employees to unionize and collectively bargain with employer. Act lays out how an employer can violate the NLRA. Incorporates definations of right-to-work vs. employment-at-will. Employers must post the National Relations Labor Board's poster for employees noting employee rights to unionize and collectively bargain. Labor

1

Newborns’ and Mothers’ Health Protection Act of 1996 The Newborns' and Mothers' Health Protection Act (Newborns' Act) includes important protections for mothers and their newborn children with regard to the length of the hospital stay following childbirth. The Newborns' Act requires that group health plans that offer maternity coverage pay for at least a 48-hour hospital stay following childbirth (96-hour stay in the case of Cesarean section). This includes self-insured plans. Click here

Implementation of the Act falls under state regulation. Check your state.
Click here

Compensation/Benefits
Labor

1

Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act) The Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act was enacted to "assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women." The OSH Act created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) at the federal level and provided that states could run their own safety and health programs as long as those programs were at least as effective as the federal program. Enforcement and administration of the OSH Act in states under federal jurisdiction is handled primarily by OSHA. Safety and health standards related to field sanitation and certain temporary labor camps in the agriculture industry are enforced by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Employment Standards Administration's Wage and Hour Division (WHD) in states under federal jurisdiction. If a work site is located in a state plan state  additional safety and health requirements may apply. Compliance materials: Click here. Risk Management
/Safety

1

OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) New changes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard are bringing the United States into alignment with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). Major changes to the Hazard Communication Stand Hazard classification: - Chemical manufacturers and importers are required to determine the hazards of the chemicals they produce or import. Hazard classification under the new, updated standard provides specific criteria to address health and physical hazards as well as classification of chemical mixtures.
- Labels: Chemical manufacturers and importers must provide a label that includes a signal word, pictogram, hazard statement, and precautionary statement for each hazard class and category.
- Safety Data Sheets: The new format requires 16 specific sections, ensuring consistency in presentation of important protection information.
- Information and training: To facilitate understanding of the new system, the new standard requires that workers be trained by December 1, 2013 on the new label elements and safety data sheet format, in addition to the current training requirements. - Chemical users: Continue to update safety data sheets when new ones become available, provide training on the new label elements and update hazard communication programs if new hazards are identified. Click here
 
Employee Development
Risk Management
/Safety

1

Pension Protection Act of 2006 Administrators of all defined benefit plans subject to Title IV of ERISA are required to furnish a funding notice each year. The recipients are the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC), each plan participant and beneficiary, each labor organization representing such participants or beneficiaries, and, in the case of a multiemployer plan, each employer that has an obligation to contribute to the plan. Click here Compensation/Benefits

1

Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 This law amended Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It illegal to discriminate against a woman because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. Click here Diversity
Employment Processes
Labor

1

Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) of 2002 Those companies that are publically traded must comply. The Act mandated a number of reforms to enhance corporate responsibility, enhance financial disclosures and combat corporate and accounting fraud. Click here.

As it relates to HR, there are specific protection for whistleblowers against their employer's retaliation and counter liabilities for the employer.

Business Strategy
Employment Processes
Risk Management
/Safety

1

Uniform Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures of 1978 The Uniform Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures were issued by the five Federal agencies having primary responsibility for the enforcement of Federal equal employment opportunity laws, to establish a uniform Federal government position. The issuing agencies recognize the need for a common interpretation of the Uniform Guidelines, as well as the desirability of providing additional guidance to employers and other users, psychologists, and investigators, compliance officers and other Federal enforcement personnel. These Questions and Answers are intended to address that need and to provide such guidance. The agencies have adopted a rule of thumb under which they will generally consider a selection rate for any race, sex, or ethnic group which is less than four-fifths (4/5ths) or eighty percent (80%) of the selection rate for the group with the highest selection rate as a substantially different rate of selection. See Section 4D. This "4/5ths" or "80%" rule of thumb is not intended as a legal definition, but is a practical means of keeping the attention of the enforcement agencies on serious discrepancies in rates of hiring, promotion and other selection decisions. Diversity
Employment Processes

1

Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) of 1994 The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) protects service members' reemployment rights when returning from a period of service in the uniformed services, including those called up from the reserves or National Guard, and prohibits employer discrimination based on military service or obligation. The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS) administers USERRA. Click here Diversity
Employment Processes
Labor

1

Veterans Benefits Improvement Act of 2004 The Veterans Benefits Improvement Act of 2004, Pub. L. No. 108-454 (December 10, 2004) (VBIA), made four changes to USERRA ...: an employer notice requirement; an extension of USERRA's health plan continuation requirements; an OSC demonstration project and the reinstatement of the USERRA Annual Report to Congress. Click here Compensation/Benefits
Employment Processes

1

Women's Health & Cancer Rights Act of 1998 The Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act (WHCRA) includes protections for individuals who elect breast reconstruction in connection with a mastectomy. WHCRA provides that group health plans and health insurance issuers that provide coverage for medical and surgical benefits with respect to mastectomies must also cover certain post-mastectomy benefits, including reconstructive surgery and the treatment of complications (such as lymphedema). Click here Compensation/Benefits

1

Workforce Reinvestment and Adult Education Act of 2003 The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) supersedes the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) and amends the Wagner-Peyser Act.WIA also contains the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (title II) and the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 (title IV). WIA reforms federal job training programs and creates a new, comprehensive workforce investment system. The reformed system is intended to be customer-focused, to help Americans access the tools they need to manage their careers through information and high quality services, and to help U.S. companies find skilled workers. Click here.

Pertains to One-Stop Career Centers. Click here

Employee Development

4

Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 Employers may hire only those persons who may legally work in the U.S., i.e., citizens and nationals of the U.S. and aliens authorized to work in the U.S. Employers cannot discriminate in hiring and employment practices based on national origin or citizen status. The employer must verify the identity and employment eligibility of anyone to be hired, which includes completing the Employment Eligibility Verification Form (I-9). Employers must keep each I-9 on file for at least three years, or one year after employment ends, whichever is longer. Click here

The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) requires employers who want to use foreign temporary workers on H-2A visas to get a labor certificate from the Employment and Training Administration certifying that there are not sufficient, able, willing and qualified U.S. workers available to do the work. The labor standards protections of the H-2A program are enforced by The Wage and Hour Division. Click here

E-Verify is an internet-based system, managed by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services within the Department of Homeland Security. It allows businesses to determine the eligibility of their employees to work in the United States. E-Verify is fast, free and easy to use – and it’s the best way employers can ensure a legal workforce. Click here

Diversity
Employment Processes

10

Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act) Every employer covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) who has more than 10 employees, except for employers in certain low-hazard industries in the retail, finance, insurance, real estate, and service sectors, must maintain specific records of job related injuries and illnesses.
The OSHA Form 300 is an injury/illness log, with a separate line entry for each recordable injury or illness. Such events include work related deaths, injuries, and illnesses other than minor injuries that require only first aid treatment and that do not involve medical treatment, loss of consciousness, restriction of work, or transfer to another job. Each year, the employer must conspicuously post in the workplace an OSHA Form 300A, which includes a summary of the previous year's work-related injuries and illnesses. Employers must also record on the OSHA Form 301 individual incident reports that provide added detail about each specific recordable injury or illness.
Safety

15

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 It is illegal to discriminate against a qualified person with a disability. It is illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. Employers must reasonably accommodate the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability who is an applicant or employee, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the employer's business. In 2009, the ADA extensively expanded the definition of disabilities as it relates to employment. It also clarified drug and alcohol abuse as it relates to disability. Click here Diversity
Employee Development Employment Processes
Labor

15

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 This law makes it illegal to discriminate against someone on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. The law also requires that employers reasonably accommodate applicants' and employees' sincerely held religious practices, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the employer's business.

The Civil Rights Act of 1991 (Pub. L. 102-166) (CRA) and the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009 (Pub. L. 111-2) amend several sections of Title VII. In addition, section 102 of the CRA... amends the Revised Statutes by adding a new section following section 1977 (42 U.S.C. 1981), to provide for the recovery of compensatory and punitive damages in cases of intentional violations of Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and section 501 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

Compensation/Benefits
Diversity
Employee Development
Employment Processes
Labor

20

Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) of 1967 ADEA protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older from employment discrimination based on age. The ADEA’s protections apply to both employees and job applicants. Under the ADEA, it is unlawful to discriminate against a person because of his/her age with respect to any term, condition, or privilege of employment, including hiring, firing, promotion, layoff, compensation, benefits, job assignments, and training. The ADEA permits employers to favor older workers based on age even when doing so adversely affects a younger worker who is 40 or older.
It is also unlawful to retaliate against an individual for opposing employment practices that discriminate based on age or for filing an age discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or litigation under the ADEA.
Compensation/Benefits
Diversity
Employment Processes
Labor

20

Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) of 1986 Former employees, whose departure was voluntary or involuntary, those in job transition, those who reduce work hours, and those in a number of other circumstances, have opportunity to maintain their company's group medical coverage for a time period. The employee can be required to cover the cost. Compensation/Benefits

50

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) of 1993 The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) provides an entitlement of up to 12 weeks of job-protected, unpaid leave during any 12-month period to eligible, covered employees for the following reasons: 1) birth and care of the eligible employee's child, or placement for adoption or foster care of a child with the employee; 2) care of an immediate family member (spouse, child, parent) who has a serious health condition; or 3) care of the employee's own serious health condition. It also requires that employee's group health benefits be maintained during the leave. The FMLA is administered by the Employment Standards Administration's Wage and Hour Division within the U.S. Department of Labor. Application of the FMLA can also be impacted by the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA), Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986 (COBRA), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), or the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Compensation/Benefits
Labor

50

Mental Health and Addition Act of Equity Act of 2008 Applies to companies that offer health care benefits. Includes parity protections with respect to annual and lifetime limits for mental health benefits, however, MHPAEA also extends parity protections to annual and lifetime dollar limits for substance use disorder benefits. In addition to maintaining parity in dollar limits, MHPAEA also contained new requirements for group health plans and group health insurance coverage. Click here Compensation/Benefits

50

Mental Health Parity Act of 1996 Provided for parity in the application of aggregate lifetime dollar limits, and annual dollar limits, between mental health benefits and medical/surgical benefits. Click here Compensation/Benefits

50

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will ensure that all Americans have access to quality, affordable health care and will create the transformation within the health care system necessary to contain costs. Compensation/Benefits

50

Health Care Education and Reconciliation Act of 2010 Amendment to the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act Compensation/Benefits

100

Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN)of 1988 The Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN) protects workers, their families, and communities by requiring most employers with 100 or more employees to provide notification 60 calendar days in advance of plant closings and mass layoffs.
Employee entitled to notice under WARN include managers and supervisors, as well as hourly and salaried workers. WARN requires that notice also be given to employees' representatives, the local chief elected official, and the state dislocated worker unit.
Advance notice gives workers and their families some transition time to adjust to the prospective loss of employment, to seek and obtain other jobs, and, if necessary, to enter skill training or retraining that will allow these workers to compete successfully in the job market.
Generally, WARN covers employers with 100 or more employees, not counting those who have worked less than six months in the last 12 months and those who work an average of less than 20 hours a week.
Employees entitled to advance notice under WARN include managers and supervisors as well as hourly and salaried workers.
Regular federal, state, and local government entities that provide public services are not covered by WARN.
The Department of Labor's (DOL) Employment and Training Administration (ETA) administers WARN at the federal level, and some states have plant closure laws of their own. A State Rapid Response Coordinator  can provide more information on notice requirements in a specific area. Click here
Business Strategy
Employment Processes
Labor
FEDERAL CONTRACTOR AND SUBCONTRACTOR    
1
Federal Contractor and Subcontractor
Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act The Act applies to federal contracts and federally assisted construction contracts over $100,000. Contractors and subcontractors must pay laborers and mechanics 1.5 times their basic rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek. It also prohibits unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous working conditions on federal, and federally financed and assisted, construction projects. Click here Compensation/Benefits
Employment Processes
Risk Management
/Safety
1
Federal Contractor and Subcontractor
Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) The Vietnam Era Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act (VEVRAA) requires covered federal government contractors and subcontractors to take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment specified categories of veterans protected by the Act and prohibits discrimination against such veterans. In addition, VEVRAA requires contractors and subcontractors to list their employment openings with the appropriate employment service delivery system, and that covered veterans receive priority in referral to such openings. Further, VEVRAA requires federal contractors and subcontractors to compile and submit annually a report on the number of current employees who are covered veterans. The affirmative action and mandatory job-listing provisions of VEVRAA are enforced by the Employment Standards Administration's Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) within the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). DOL’s Veterans’ Employment and Training Service (VETS) administers the veterans’ employment reporting requirement. Click here Diversity
Employment Processes
1
Federal Contractor and Subcontractor
Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act of 1936 The Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act (PCA) requires contractors engaged in the manufacturing or furnishing of materials, supplies, articles, or equipment to the U.S. government or the District of Columbia to pay employees who produce, assemble, handle, or ship goods under contracts exceeding $10,000, the federal minimum wage for all hours worked and time and one half their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek.
The PCA is enforced by the Employment Standards Administration's Wage and Hour Division (WHD) within the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). Click here
Compensation/Benefits
1
Federal Contractor and Subcontractor
Copeland Act of 1934 Prohibits federal contractors or subcontractors engaged in building construction or repair from inducing an employee to give up any part of the compensation to which he or she is entitled under his or her employment contract and requires such contractors and subcontractors to submit weekly statements of compliance. Click here Compensation/Benefits
Employment Processes
1
Federal Contractor and Subcontractor
Davis-Bacon Act of 1931 Requires payment of prevailing wages on federally funded or assisted construction projects. Click here Compensation/Benefits
1
Federal Contractor
Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 Some federal contractors must provide a drug free workplace. This is determined on a case-by-case basis...requirements coexist with the collective bargaining process...the drug-awareness program must be "ongoing"... reporting requirements of the regulations pertain only to convictions for the unlawful use, possession, etc., of drugs occurring in the workplace. Click here Employment Processes
Labor
Risk Management
/Safety
15
Federal Contractor and Subcontractor
Executive Order 13201 of 2001 NOTICE OF EMPLOYEE RIGHTS CONCERNING PAYMENT OF UNION DUES
Executive Order 13201 (E.O. 13201) requires Government contracts and subcontracts to include an employee notice clause requiring non-exempt Federal contractors and subcontractors to post notices informing their employees that they have certain rights related to union membership and use of union dues and fees under Federal law. The clause does not have to be included in government contracts for purchases below the Simplified Acquisition Threshold (currently $100,000). Also, certain contractors or work sites are exempt from the Executive Order. Click here
Employment Processes
Labor
50
Federal Contractor and Subcontractor
Executive Order 11246 of 1965 The Executive Order prohibits federal contractors and federally-assisted construction contractors and subcontractors, who do over $10,000 in Government business in one year, from discriminating in employment decisions on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. The Executive Order also requires Government contractors to take affirmative action to ensure that equal opportunity is provided in all aspects of their employment. Diversity
Employee Development
Employment Processes
50
Federal Contractor
EEO-1 Report The Standard Form 100, Employer Identification Report (EEO-1 Report) requires that employers report on the number of employees by race, ethnicity and gender for each of nine job categories. The EEO-1 Report must be filed annually, not later than September 30, by:
All Private employers that are subject to Title VII and have 100 or more employees.
All Federal contractors with 50 or more employees and a prime contract or first-tier subcontract amounting to $50,000 or more.
Diversity
Employment Processes
Federal Contractor and Subcontractor Service Contract of 1965 The McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act (SCA) applies to every contract entered into by the United States or the District of Columbia, the principal purpose of which is to furnish services to the United States through the use of service employees. The SCA requires contractors and subcontractors performing services on covered federal or District of Columbia contracts in excess of $2,500 to pay service employees in various classes no less than the monetary wage rates and to furnish fringe benefits found prevailing in the locality, or the rates (including prospective increases) contained in a predecessor contractor's collective bargaining agreement. Safety and health standards also apply to such contracts. Click here. Compensation/Benefits
Labor
Risk Management
/Safety
Union officials and members Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959 (LMRDA) The Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959 (LMRDA) provides standards for the reporting and disclosure of certain financial transactions and administrative practices of labor organizations and employers; the protection of union funds and assets; the administration of trusteeships by labor organizations; and the election of officers of labor organizations. The Act also guarantees certain rights to all union members.
The Office of Labor-Management Standards (OLMS) of the U.S. Department of Labor administers and enforces most provisions of the LMRDA. Click here
Labor


 



 

 

 


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